Supporting Local Arts

Cook City Suites loves the arts. We feel strongly about supporting the Philadelphia art community. Many of us are artists ourselves and have artists in our families. We are proud to promote Philadelphia artists through our luxury suites.

Every Cook City Suites apartment features work by a local Philadelphia artist. We work with each artist to curate the space with their work. We find that original art warms up our suites and gives them the personal touch that makes an apartment feel more like home than a hotel.

We also have science on our side – several studies show that original artwork reduces stress and can even promote physical healing!

We provide a bio and contact information for each artist so that you can learn more about the inspiration that went into each piece. If you find that a piece speaks to you, we encourage you to reach out directly to the artist for purchase. They will receive 100% of the proceeds for their work.

We are proud to introduce the Cook City Suites team of artists that have graced us with their work:

Judy Caldwell

My painting celebrates my childhood memories and visions, as I grew up on my grandfather’s apple farm in New Hampshire. My paint, mind, and body continue to explore this landscape: hearing the rushing of birch leaves, warmed by the sun’s dappling on the forest floor, or being refreshed by rain as it slips off the maple trees above.

I am barefoot in my studio or dance to the breeze outdoors, as I listen to my intuitive selection of color. I apply paint mostly with pieces of wood or my hands so I can remain free to move with spontaneous abandon as I, once again, can come home. 

Brian Dennis

“My goal is two fold, obviously I want to create something that presents a beauty and truth. Second, and what is personally most important is the act of making. While working I become focused only on the matter in hand and I experience a wholeness with the world. Ironically, the results express the ethos of an outsider, things are hidden or so obscured it is often difficult to know what you are seeing. This outcome is very akin to my experience when I am making. I am vaguely aware of a liquid consciousness, passing snippets of something dissolving and reforming, all just out of range of knowing. It is this realm that directs my work.

Transcendence is also important to my work, not only the experience of Making, but also for the materials to become other then what they were. I am drawn to use common materials that I strive to push beyond their original context. I do the same with the photographic images I appropriate. They are chosen usually not by their subject matter, but by a shape or color that interests me, a form that may capture the realm floating in my peripheral vision.”

Stella Untalan

“My drawings focus on measurement and probing. A ping. Each series of marks is made by filling a tool then making marks until the ink is gone.

I have always been drawn to make marks. The repetition allows me to be caught up in a rhythm; the proximity of the marks create rest and action. This is central to my work. Using tools that ask me to focus on each mark creates a meditative state. Each mark seems to take an eternity. I touch the surface, make the mark, and then move away.

In this work the process defines the outcome. It is minimalist, repetitive, and iterative. There is an absence of thought. Loss of concentration creates the unexpected. The unexpected however, is embraced.”

Keith R. Breitfeller

“The theme of my painting has been a search for stillness, a form of meditative calm. Painting is my escape from a world of too much noise and information. It’s a way to step away from those inner dialogues that keep us from being truly calm. My work is an oasis away from the complexities of modern living where one can reflect on what is essential.”

Jessica Eldredge

“My work has always been about color and pattern inspired by quilts, weaving and other textiles as well as decorative arts such as stained glass and tiles – anything that puts lots of small things together to make a larger whole. My time at Winterthur and working at the Textile Museum in Washington, D.C. filters through in most everything I make. 

After a long absence from art making, I began again by making collages, first with magazines, then with origami and other paper, and eventually began to create my own with fiber-reactive fabric dye. I have continued using the dye in my most recent work, painting with it on paper. These works explore images of nets and kaleidoscopes, and the endless possibilities of structure and beauty.”

Sara Cook

“I want people to see my paintings and find something interesting in them. I want the colors to give people positive feelings and for the gestures and movement to be thought provoking. My paintings are often layers of past paintings that I couldn’t quite bring myself to like or be satisfied with. These layers of painting after painting eventually cumulate into something I am pleased with. I like the history of this push/ pull and early mornings/late nights on the canvas. The painting is a product of laying awake and turning the lights on and off to check how it strikes me at first glance over and over.”

Judy Fowler

“My paintings are memories of places that have moved me. My work is abstract because I want it to be universal. Color is the keystone of my work. I am interested in what makes colors work, how they move in and out, how they interact, and especially what makes them sing and convey feelings. I paint in layers, starting with a thin coat of pigment. Building up the layers until the colors make a harmonious whole that has depth and glows.”

Call to Artists! Want to hang your artwork in a Cook City Suites apartment? Email jessica@cookcitysuites.com

Have questions? Please check out our FAQs for Cook City Suites artists!

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